Archive: "exhibits" Tag

A Christmas Welcome to the Saviour Guest

Special Collections’ latest exhibit features Christmas tales and poems from the 19th century. It brings together items from across our major collecting areas: the Americana, Victorian, Rare American Literature, Fine Press, and Literary Manuscripts collections. This is a great chance to see the breadth of our literature collections—from a first edition of A Christmas Carol …

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Curious Remedies: The Art of Dissection

Curious Remedies, the library’s current main floor exhibit, highlights the contributions of scientists and physicians of the Renaissance and Early Modern periods. One such individual is Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), whose monumental book on anatomy, De Humani Corporis Fabrica (On the Fabric of the Human Body, often shortened to Fabrica) was first published in 1543. Vesalius …

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Bazaar Literature

Special Collections’ newest major exhibit, Welcome to Our Charity Bazaar, features an interesting subgenre of Victorian literature: poems, stories, and books produced for sale at fundraising fairs throughout the 19th century in Great Britain and the United States. Many famous authors of the period contributed pieces which were printed either as standalone items or anthologized …

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Robert Hooke and the Microscope

Today marks the birth of English scientist Robert Hooke in 1635. Hooke dabbled in many branches of the arts and sciences, including astronomy, physics, watchmaking, and architecture. He was a member of the Royal Society and served as its curator of experiments, which meant that he demonstrated several experiments at each of the Society’s meetings …

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Walking With Thoreau

Philosopher, naturalist, and writer Henry David Thoreau was born July 12, 1817. To celebrate the life of this influential American writer, Special Collections is displaying first editions of his work in our reference room, including copies of Walden and “Civil Disobedience.” The exhibit, “Walking With Thoreau: A 200th Anniversary Celebration,” is on display throughout the …

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Curious Remedies: Renaissance Surgery

Surgery is never a fun experience, but can you imagine what it would have been like before the advent of general anesthetic and other modern medical advances? The current Harold B. Lee Library exhibit Curious Remedies: Medicine During the Renaissance provides a glimpse into the medical technology of the 16th and 17th centuries. On display …

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It is an ancient Mariner . . . exhibit

This month’s Special Collections lobby exhibit, “The Willing Suspension of Disbelief,” is devoted to Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” from its first appearance in the 1798 Lyrical Ballads (shown here) to modern illustrated editions. And, since it’s National Poetry Month, you’re invited to a dramatic reading of the poem by the …

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It’s poetry season in Special Collections!

If you’re a poetry fan, you’ll want to stop by Special Collections in March and April to view our new lobby exhibits! This month, we’re displaying “Songs and Flowers of the Wasatch,” a Woman’s History Month exhibit which features lyrics and poems by 19th century Utah women. And next month — National Poetry Month, of …

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Curious Remedies: The Making of Early Modern Medicine

The Lee Library’s current exhibit, “Curious Remedies: Medicine During the Renaissance,” highlights medical knowledge of the Renaissance and Early Modern period with books from Special Collections. Before chemical engineering or even the discovery of penicillin, physicians relied on plants, minerals, and animals to concoct medicines for their patients. Botanical encyclopedias called herbals helped scientists identify …

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