Archive: "World History and Culture" Category

Happy Reformation Day!

  October 31, 2017 marks exactly 500 years since Martin Luther sent his 95 theses to the Archbishop of Mainz (and likely posted them to the door of the local church in Wittenberg). The theses were rapidly printed and reprinted and spread across Germany over the following months. Special Collections owns a copy of one …

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Scary Halloween

Halloween is fun for little children who dress up and go looking for candy whether it is in the neighborhood or trunk and treat at the local church. Pumpkins and candy corn are abundant. But then they get older and want Halloween to be a little spookier. Wilson Folklore Archives has lots of spooky stories …

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Curious Remedies: The Art of Dissection

Curious Remedies, the library’s current main floor exhibit, highlights the contributions of scientists and physicians of the Renaissance and Early Modern periods. One such individual is Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), whose monumental book on anatomy, De Humani Corporis Fabrica (On the Fabric of the Human Body, often shortened to Fabrica) was first published in 1543. Vesalius …

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Pretty coverings

About a year ago the Wilson Folklore Archives received a gift of a beautiful coverlet that was about 100 years old. It had an interesting history. Back In the South, I believe Tennessee, a young girl wanted to start a handiwork project. She was about 14. Her father gave her some land to plant cotton …

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New exhibit exploring Victorian women’s history now open

Victorian women weren’t allowed to vote, and in fact, they were often discouraged from attending public meetings, so they had to find creative ways to influence public policy and advance social causes. One method was organizing a charity bazaar, or “fancy fair,” which sold handicrafts and other items to raise money for a popular cause …

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Historic solar eclipses

Here in Provo, Utah, people are gearing up for the solar eclipse which will be visible in our area on August 21. To add to the festivities, we’ve pulled out a few books (both scientific and literary) about eclipses of past centuries. This small pamphlet was published by astronomer Johann Erich Müller in Greifswald, Germany, …

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Robert Hooke and the Microscope

Today marks the birth of English scientist Robert Hooke in 1635. Hooke dabbled in many branches of the arts and sciences, including astronomy, physics, watchmaking, and architecture. He was a member of the Royal Society and served as its curator of experiments, which meant that he demonstrated several experiments at each of the Society’s meetings …

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New acquisitions: medieval manuscript facsimiles

Facsimiles of two famous illuminated medieval manuscripts have recently been added to Special Collections’ holdings. Both are associated with known artists and they are now available for consultation in the reading room or in the classroom. The Godescalc Evangelistary This famous liturgical book was commissioned by Charlemagne and written by a Frankish scribe named Godescalc …

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Auction catalogs available for research

Art history students and other researchers interested in provenance and trends in the fine art and rare books trades will soon have access to Special Collections’ print auction catalogs. Our holdings of Swann Galleries, Sotheby’s, and Christie’s auction catalogs are in the process of being added to the library catalog. Swann Galleries’ auction catalogs are …

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